Monday, December 30, 2013

New Year’s Resolutions for a Healthy Smile


With the new year approaching, you may have already begun to think about your New Year’s resolutions. You may be considering resolving to save money, get a better job or lose weight. Many people set new goals about having a healthier lifestyle in the new year. Why not make one of your New Year’s resolutions improving your dental health?
Healthy resolutions can keep your teeth healthy, and any of the following strategies will go a long way toward giving you a brighter, healthier smile in the coming year:

Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables

Eating well is important for your dental health. Poor nutrition can affect the entire immune system, increasing susceptibility to many common oral disorders, including gum (periodontal) disease. Antioxidants and other nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts improve your body’s ability to fight bacteria and inflammation, helping to protect your teeth and gums. In addition, crisp fruits and raw vegetables like apples, carrots and celery help clean plaque from teeth and freshen breath.

Quit Smoking or Using Other Tobacco Products

Using tobacco can harm your mouth in a number of ways, increasing your risk for tooth discoloration, cavities, gum recession, gum disease and throat, lung and oral cancer. Smokers are about twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers. It’s not just smoking tobacco that has negative effects on your oral health: use of smokeless tobacco can be just as harmful to your oral health. The good news is that the risk of tooth loss decreases after you quit smoking or using smokeless tobacco.

Limit Your Alcohol Intake

You may already know that excessive alcohol intake can have an effect on your overall health, but did you know that it may also affect your oral health? According to the Academy of General Dentistry, those who smoke, eat poorly and consume excessive alcohol also have increased gum recession (periodontal pocketing). Their studies show that smokers who regularly consume alcohol are less likely to brush their teeth on a regular basis and are less concerned about their basic health than nonsmokers.

Brush at Least Twice a Day and Floss at Least Once a Day

Brushing and flossing protect your teeth from decay and gum disease, which is caused by your teeth’s most persistent enemy, plaque – a sticky, colorless, invisible film of harmful bacteria that builds up on your teeth every day. Both brushing and flossing are equally important for good oral health: according to the Academy of General Dentistry, only flossing can remove plaque from between teeth and below the gumline, where decay and gum disease often begins.
Without proper brushing and flossing, you may develop bleeding gums, which may worsen to severely swollen, red, bleeding gums (gingivitis) and, eventually, gum disease. Because diseases of the mouth can affect the rest of your body, it is especially important to maintain good oral health.

See Your Dentist for Regular Checkups

By seeing your dentist at least twice a year, you can help prevent any dental health problems before they cause discomfort or require more comprehensive or expensive treatment. Regular visits allow your dentist to monitor your oral health and recommend a dental health regimen to address areas of concern.

For this new year, resolve to treat your mouth right: improve your diet, quit smoking and improve your oral hygiene habits – your teeth and your body will thank you for it!

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Holiday sweets can be tough on teeth



The winter holidays are known for sweet treats and tempting goodies, but that doesn't mean that you have to end up at the dentist with cavities in January.

How do sweet foods and drinks cause cavities?

When you eat sugary foods or drinks, naturally occurring bacteria in the mouth feed on the sugar and create acids as a by-product. These acids then wear down the tooth enamel, making it weaker and more susceptible to tooth decay as well as a host of other problems, including gingivitis.
Snacking on sweets throughout the day or during an extended period of time (such as at a holiday party) is especially harmful, since damaging acids form in the mouth every time you eat a sugary snack and continue to affect the teeth for at least 20 minutes afterwards.
"Snacking on sweets and sugary beverages throughout the day can increase the chance of tooth decay and gum disease," says Ken Sutherland, DDS, a senior Delta Dental dentist consultant. "Brushing and flossing after snacks definitely reduces bacteria."

Simple steps for holiday oral care

The best way to avoid cavities while still enjoying your holiday indulgences is to practice good oral hygiene. Here are some tips to help:
  • Eating sugary or carbohydrate-rich foods as part of a balanced meal is better than eating them alone. The body produces more saliva to help digest larger meals, which washes away more food and helps neutralize harmful acids before they can attack teeth.
  • Foods that take a long time to chew can damage teeth. That's because sticky foods, including nutritious choices like raisins, dates and dried fruit, hold acid against teeth longer than do other foods. Try to limit your consumption of these foods.
  • After consuming high-acid food (fruits) or drinks (wine), rinse with water before brushing your teeth to prevent tooth erosion from the acids.
  • Keep a toothbrush and travel-size toothpaste handy (for example, in your pocket or purse or store these in the glove compartment of your car) so that you can brush right after eating at holiday parties. An added benefit is that you are less likely to eat after you brush your teeth, so you may end up eating less at parties.
  • If you're unable to brush your teeth after eating, rinsing your mouth thoroughly with water or chewing sugar-free gum will help to wash away food particles, produce more saliva and neutralize acids in your mouth

"Brush up" on your technique


Use your holiday vacations to spend more time brushing your teeth. If you're relaxed or have more free time during the day or with your morning or nightly routine, you can use the time to brush more thoroughly and develop better oral care habits.
It isn't necessary to brush vigorously to get your teeth clean. What's important when brushing your teeth is not how hard you scrub, but that you use the proper technique and that you do a thorough job. And that takes time. Dentists recommend that you brush your teeth for two to three minutes to get the most thorough cleaning.

If you get into the habit of brushing for two to three minutes every morning, every night and after every meal during the holidays, you may keep those good habits when your regular routine resumes.

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Monday, October 28, 2013

Tobacco and Dental Health


How Does Smoking Lead to Gum Disease?

Smoking and other tobacco products can lead to gum disease by affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to your teeth. More specifically, it appears that smoking interferes with the normal function of gum tissue cells. This interference makes smokers more susceptible to infections, such as periodontal disease, and also seems to impair blood flow to the gums - which may affect wound healing.


Do Pipe and Cigar Smoking Cause Dental Problems?

Yes, like cigarettes, pipes and cigars do lead to oral health problems. According to results of a 23-year long study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, cigar smokers experience tooth loss and alveolar bone loss (bone loss within the jawbone that anchors teeth) at rates equivalent to those of cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers also have a similar risk of tooth loss as cigarette smokers. Beyond these risks, pipe and cigar smokers are still at risk for oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancers -- even if they don't inhale -- and other oral consequences -- bad breath, stained teeth, and increased risk of periodontal (gum) disease.


Are Smokeless Tobacco Products Safer?

No. Like cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products (for example, snuff and chewing tobacco) contain at least 28 chemicals that have been shown to increase the risk of oral cancer and cancer of the throat and esophagus. In fact, chewing tobacco contains higher levels of nicotine than cigarettes, making it harder to quit than cigarettes. And one can of snuff delivers more nicotine than over 60 cigarettes.
Smokeless tobacco can irritate your gum tissue, causing it to recede or pull away from your teeth. Once the gum tissue recedes, your teeth roots become exposed, creating an increased risk of tooth decay. Exposed roots are also more sensitive to hot and cold or other irritants, making eating and drinking uncomfortable.
In addition, sugars, which are often added to enhance the flavor of smokeless tobacco, can increase your risk for tooth decay. A study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to develop tooth decay.

Smokeless tobacco also typically contains sand and grit, which can wear down your teeth. 





1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Oral health during pregnancy...


What to expect when expecting you have so much to think about during pregnancy, 
but don’t overlook your oral health, which can be affected by the hormonal
changes you will experience during this time. For example, women are more likely to
develop gingivitis during pregnancy. Gingivitis is an infection of the gingivae (gums) that can
cause swelling and tenderness. Your gums also may bleed a little when you brush or floss. Left
untreated, gingivitis can affect the supporting tissues that hold your teeth in place. Your dentist
may recommend more frequent cleanings to prevent gingivitis.

Sometimes lumps appear along the gum line and between teeth. These swellings are harmless,
but they bleed easily and are characterized by a red, raw-looking mulberrylike surface.
Although these growths are called “pregnancy tumors,” they are not cancerous. 
They usually go away on their own after pregnancy, but they can be removed 
under a local anesthetic if they bother you.

DENTAL CARE
You should continue to see your dentist during pregnancy for oral examinations and professional
teeth cleaning. Tell your dentist that you are pregnant and about any changes you have
noticed in your oral health. Also, be sure to let your dentist know about
any medications or supplements you are taking. Your dentist may need to
 use or prescribe medication as part of your treatment. 
Some medications are considered safe for limited use during
pregnancy and some should not be used at all. For example, if you develop an infection, 
yourdentist might prescribe penicillin or amoxicillin. 
However, pregnant women should not be treated with tetracycline 
because it can stain the fetus’ developing teeth. Once they erupt, the
teeth may look gray or brown permanently as a result of these stains. 
Your dentist or physician can talk with you about
 medications that are safe to use during pregnancy.
Although radiography (x-rays) often can be delayed until after your baby is born, 
your dentist may need to obtain a radiograph as part of your dental treatment.
 To minimize your exposure and that of the fetus to x-rays, your dentist will cover 
your abdomen with a protective apron
and place a thyroid collar over your throat. Talk with your dentist or 
physician about any concerns you may have about your treatment. 
Good daily care is key to your oral health. To
help prevent caries (tooth decay) and gum disease, brush your teeth thoroughly
 twice a day with fluoridetoothpaste to remove plaque. 
Be sure to clean between your teeth daily
with floss or another interdental cleaner. Ask your dentist or hygienist to
show you how to brush and floss correctly. When choosing oral care products,
look for those that display the American Dental Association’s Seal of Acceptance, 
your assurance that they have met ADA criteria for safety and effectiveness.


DIET
Frequent snacking may increase your risk of developing tooth decay, which is caused by
plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that forms constantly on teeth. The bacteria convert sugar and
starch that remain in the mouth after eating to acid that attacks tooth enamel. The longer the
sugars remain in your mouth, the longer the acids attack. 
After repeated attacks, tooth decay can result.

ORAL HEALTH AND OVERALL HEALTH
Your oral health is an important part of your overall health, and untreated dental disease can
be harmful to you and your baby. Be sure to include your oral health in your daily self-care
routine and keep your dentist informed of any changes in your oral health during pregnancy. 


1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Sunday, September 29, 2013

It can happen at any age.....


At what age does gum disease generally start?
Gum disease can start at any age. Children and teenagers who have diabetes are at greater risk for gum disease than those who don't have diabetes.

How can I help prevent dental problems associated with diabetes?
First and foremost, control your blood glucose level. Then take good care of your teeth and gums, along with regular dental check-ups every six months.


Additional Oral Care Tips for Those with Diabetes
  • Have a dental checkup every six months, or as often as indicated by a professional.
  • Tell your dentist or hygienest that you have diabetes and any other medical condition.
  • Brush for two minutes a day with a toothpaste with an antigingival/antibacterial ingredient to help prevent gingivitis and one that accepted by the American Dental Association.
  • Contact your dentist or hygienist if you experience any of these signs of gum disease:
    • Gums that bleed or are red, puffy or swollen, or sore
    • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
    • Changes in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
    • Pus that appears between your teeth and your gums
    • Constant bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth
1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Step By Step How to Brush Your Teeth-

  • Start with your upper molars (back teeth) on your left side and work in a clockwise direction. 
  • Point the bristles toward the gumline, in a 45-degree angle. Use a short circular motion for approximately 20 seconds. After 20 seconds, roll the brush head away from the gumline, so the bristles sweep the surface of the tooth, removing the food and plaque.


  • Continue working in a clockwise direction, ending with the lower molars on your left side. Repeat step two and three for the inside surface of the upper and lower molars.
  • Brush the lingual (back) surface of the upper-front teeth by using the tip of the toothbrush head. Direct the bristles toward the gumline, and use a flicking motion down the surface of the tooth. Do this 2 to 3 times.
  • Point the bristles of the tip of the toothbrush toward the gumline. Flick the bristles up, away from the gumline in a sweeping motion. Do this 2 to 3 times.
  • Brush the biting surface of the upper and lower premolars and molars, using a circular motion.
  • Using a gentle circular motion, brush your tongue for 30 seconds and the inside of your cheeks for 30 seconds. 
  • Finish by rinsing with either water or your choice of mouthwash.

 Don't forget to smile!

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Saturday, September 14, 2013

What are the signs of gingivitis and/or serious gum disease?
Some of the possible signs of gingivitis and/or serious gum disease include:


  • Bleeding and red, swollen, or tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth.
  • Pus between the teeth and gums (when you press on the gums)
  • Bad breath
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or moving away from each other
  • Changes in the way your teeth fit when you bite
  • Changes in the fit of partial dentures or bridges                                                                                                                                                                              
            If you have any of the above, see your dentist.


1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or


Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Myth or Fact About Cavities?

Sugar Is the Prime Cause of Cavities

Myth, but it's almost a fact.

The truth is, acid produced by bacteria in your mouth is the cause of cavities, says Kimberly A. Harms, DDS, an American Dental Association consumer advisor and former president of the Minnesota Dental Association. However, these bacteria are triggered to make acid when you eat anything with carbohydrates -- and sugar is a carb.

Rice, potatoes, bread, fruits, and vegetables are also carbs.
Once the acid eats into your tooth, the bacteria “have a nice little hole to live in where your toothbrush and floss can’t reach,” says Harms. The bacteria continue to metabolize carbs and produce acids -- and your cavity just keeps getting bigger.

Here’s an important fact. It’s not the amount of carbs you eat that causes tooth decay, but the length of time your teeth are exposed. If you eat a lot of carbs for lunch, that’s one big exposure. But if you spend the day sipping sugary drinks, that’s continuous exposure -- and much more unhealthy for your teeth.


“We have a saying,” says Harms. “Sip all day and get decay.”


1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or


Friday, August 16, 2013

Tips for Caregivers


Saturday, August 10, 2013

Fluoride - What is Fluoride?





Fluoride, a naturally occurring mineral, is often added to drinking water and is commonly found in toothpaste. Research has shown that the rate of cavities decreases in areas where fluoride is added to the water supply. Health authorities, such as The American Dental Association and The World Health Organization, both advocate the addition of fluoride to drinking water, and recommend you use toothpaste that contains fluoride, if age appropriate.

If you do not have fluoride in your water, fluoride is also available in:
  • Tablets
  • Rinse
  • Varnish
  • Foam
Speak with your dentist if you are concerned whether or not you are receiving enough, or too much fluoride daily. Fluoride treatments are also given at your dental office after a cleaning appointment every six months to one year. 

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or



Monday, July 29, 2013

When Should Dental Care Start?


Proper dental care begins before a baby's first tooth appears. Just because you can't see the teeth doesn't mean they aren't there. Teeth actually begin to form in the second trimester of pregnancy. At birth, your baby has 20 primary teeth, some of which are fully developed in the jaw.


Running a damp washcloth over a baby's gums daily will help clear away harmful bacteria.
Parents can brush kids' teeth as they come in with an infant toothbrush, using water with just a smear of toothpaste until about age 2.
Around age 2, most kids can spit while brushing. Use a pea-sized amount of toothpaste,
with supervision, until around age 5.
Even babies can develop tooth decay if good feeding habits aren't practiced. Putting a baby to sleep with a bottle might be convenient, but can harm the baby's teeth. When the sugars from juice or milk remain on a baby's teeth for hours, they can eat away at the enamel, creating a condition known as "bottle mouth". Pocked, pitted, or discolored front teeth are signs of bottle mouth. Severe cases result in cavities and the need to pull all of the front teeth until the permanent ones grow in.

Parents and childcare providers should help young kids set specific times for drinking each day because sucking on a bottle throughout the day can be equally damaging to young teeth.

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or


Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Diabetes and Oral Health Problems

The more severe form of gum disease is called periodontitis. When you reach this stage, your gums begin to pull away from your teeth. Pockets form between your teeth and gums. These fill with germs and pus, and deepen. When this happens, you may need gum surgery to save your teeth. If nothing is done, the infection goes on to destroy the bone around your teeth. The teeth may start to move or get loose. Your teeth may fall out or need to be pulled.


Is There an Association Between Gum Disease and Diabetes?

For the nearly 26 million Americans who have diabetes, many may be surprised to learn about an unexpected complication associated with this condition. Research shows that there is an increased prevalence of gum disease among those with diabetes, adding serious gum disease to the list of other complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.


Is There a Two-Way Street?

Emerging research also suggests that the relationship between serious gum disease and diabetes is two-way. Not only are people with diabetes more susceptible to serious gum disease, but serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Research suggests that people with diabetes are at higher risk for oral health problems, such as gingivitis (an early stage of gum disease) and periodontitis (serious gum disease). People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums.
The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health states that good oral health is integral to general health. So be sure to brush and floss properly and see your dentist for regular checkups.


If I Have Diabetes, am I at Risk for Dental Problems?

If your blood glucose levels are poorly controlled, you are more likely to develop serious gum disease and lose more teeth than non-diabetics. Like all infections, serious gum disease may be a factor in causing blood sugar to rise and may make diabetes harder to control.
Other oral problems associated to diabetes include: thrush, an infection caused by fungus that grows in the mouth, and dry mouth which can cause soreness, ulcers, infections and cavities.


How Can I Help Prevent Dental Problems Associated with Diabetes?

First and foremost, control your blood glucose level. Then, take good care of your teeth and gums, along with regular checkups every six months. To control thrush, a fungal infection, maintain good diabetic control, avoid smoking and, if you wear them, remove and clean dentures daily. Good blood glucose control can also help prevent or relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.


What Can I Expect at My Checkup? Should I Tell My Dental Professional About My Diabetes?

People with diabetes have special needs and your dentist and hygienist are equipped to meet those needs - with your help. Keep your dentist and hygienist informed of any changes in your condition and any medication you might be taking. Postpone any non-emergency dental procedures if your blood sugar is not in good control.

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/diabetes-and-oral.html

1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Monday, June 10, 2013

Causes of “dry mouth” and how to relieve it

In recent years, prescribed and over-the-counter medications have emerged as the most common cause of dry mouth. Suspect medications include antihistamines, decongestants, painkillers, diuretics, antihypertensive medications and antidepressants. In fact, dry mouth is listed as a potential side effect of more than 400 medications. Be sure to read the literature that accompanies your medications and, if you think a medication is causing dry mouth, tell your dentist or physician. In some cases, a different medication may alleviate the problem.

What is dry mouth?

Dry mouth is caused by a decrease in the amount of saliva in the mouth when the salivary glands do not work properly. The salivary glands help keep your mouth moist, which helps prevent tooth decay and other oral health problems. The medical name of the condition is xerostomia.
Although a common cause of dry mouth these days is medication, the condition may occur when a person experiences stress, or it may even be a sign of a serious health problem, such as AIDS, diabetes or Sjogren’s Syndrome (an autoimmune disease). Other possible causes include aging, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. People with Alzheimer’s disease or who suffer a stroke have been known to experience dry mouth.

How to relieve dry mouth

Your dentist or physician may recommend using artificial saliva — available at local pharmacies — to keep oral tissues lubricated. But the solution may be as simple as increasing your water intake. Other tips on how to ease dry mouth include:
  • Brush and floss twice a day
  • Chew sugarless gum
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine, carbonated beverages and smoking
  • Avoid certain juices (orange, grapefruit and tomato)
  • Avoid dry foods, such as toast or crackers
  • Avoid overly salty foods
  • Use alcohol-free oral rinses
  • Visit your dentist regularly. Ask your dentist for advice specific to your situation.
If your dry mouth persists, you should contact your physician.
Source: Academy of General Dentistry (www.agd.org)

1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

6 Habits That Put Plaque on Your Teeth


Plaque. Since childhood, we’ve been trained to resist that dreaded enemy of teeth. Regular brushing and flossing are sure bets for dental health. What else could you be doing -- or avoiding -- to keep plaque off your knockout smile?
“Keeping plaque off your teeth isn’t complicated, but consistency is key,” says Richard Price, DMD, spokesman for the American Dental Association. “Good habits make for healthy teeth -- for most people, it’s that simple,” Price tells WebMD.


What Is Tooth Plaque?

Plaque is a sticky mix of bacteria and the substances they secrete. Bacteria produce adhesive chemicals called mucopolysaccharides. The bacteria then live in this film on teeth, called a biofilm.
At first, this slimy layer is fragile and easily removed by tooth brushing. “Think of the film on a fish tank wall. It’s easy to wipe off with a washcloth, if you’re vigilant,” says Price.
And if you’re not? The bacteria in tooth plaque are free to release acids that damage tooth enamel. Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called cavities.
If left alone, plaque buildup also gradually hardens, creating tartar or calculus on your teeth.
“Tartar is petrified plaque,” Price says. “Once it’s there, you need a dentist’s help ... tartar can’t be brushed off.” Tartar above the gum line also contributes to gingivitis, which is gum disease.
The secrets to avoiding plaque buildup aren’t so secret. You’ve probably been hearing most of them since before you lost your baby teeth. But bad habits have a way of sneaking up on us. Make sure you’re pushing back against plaque by avoiding these five bad habits for tooth health.

Plaque Habit No. 1: Not Brushing Regularly

No one else might notice if you don’t brush your teeth twice a day, every day. But your teeth will.
“Plaque is a little like bees in the summertime,” Price says. “One or two won’t really bother you, but if you let them build a beehive in the backyard, you’ve got a problem.”
Brush your teeth gently twice a day, using a fluoride-containing toothpaste. The exact technique isn’t as important as concentrating to make sure you’re softly brushing all the surfaces of your teeth.


Plaque Habit No. 2: Not Flossing Each Day

Brushing doesn’t reach the spaces between teeth, but plaque does. A simple daily flossing between teeth clears away plaque before it can cause damage.
“Flossing also cleans plaque at the gum line, another area that brushing doesn’t reach,” says Price. If left alone, plaque below the gum line can lead to periodontal disease.
If you just can’t stand flossing your teeth, consider using one of the many other ADA-approved products to clean between your teeth each day. They’re available in any supermarket or drugstore; ask your dentist if you’re not sure which one to use.


Plaque Habit No. 3: Not Using Rinses

Mouth rinses with fluoride have been shown to prevent decay. Antibacterial rinses reduce plaque and gingivitis and attack bad breath. Keep brushing and flossing, and if you haven’t already, add a mouth rinse, such as an antimicrobial or a fluoride rinse (not just a mouthwash), for a triple threat against teeth destroyers.

Plaque Habit No. 4: Avoiding the Dentist

Even if you brush and floss your teeth daily, you’ll miss some plaque. Over time, that plaque hardens into tartar that needs to be removed at your dentist’s office. Yet more than a third of people surveyed haven’t seen their dentist in more than a year.
“Even dentists don’t like to go to the dentist,” jokes Price. But studies show that in general, people who neglect regular dentist visits get more cavities and have a higher chance of losing their teeth.
Once a year teeth cleanings are considered the minimum. Twice a year teeth cleanings may be better for many people. “Most dentists recommend twice a year cleanings or more,” according to Price.

Plaque Habit No. 5: Neglecting Nature’s Toothbrushes

Long before toothbrushes and fluoride toothpaste existed, certain foods played a role in keeping plaque off of teeth.
“Eating crunchy vegetables or fruits with the skin on can scrub off plaque,” Price tells WebMD. Carrots, apples, cucumbers, and many other raw fruits and vegetables are teeth-friendly, despite the sugar they contain.
In addition, a diet high in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods protects you from obesity, heart disease, and cancer.


Plaque Habit No. 6: Indulging Your Sweet Tooth

Bacteria love simple carbohydrates like sugar. Eating candy or drinking sugary soft drinks lets sugar stick to our teeth, giving bacteria something to munch on. As the bacteria create a film of plaque, they digest sugar into acid, which damages teeth.
“All sugary candy, and most junk food in general, contribute to plaque formation,” Price says. “High-sugar foods or drinks that are also soft or sticky are especially problematic. ... Sugary soft drinks might be about the worst thing you can put on your teeth."
Avoiding these six bad habits can help you keep plaque in check (and keep your teeth).
You may also want to talk about sealants with your dentist. The pits and fissures on molars can be difficult to keep clean in some people, even with good dental care. Dental sealants are a clear plastic coating that covers the tooth surface, barring bacteria and acid from entering. Sealants are safe and effective in blocking plaque and preventing tooth decay.
“No one’s teeth can stay plaque-free 24 hours a day, it’s just not possible,” says Price. But good habits over a lifetime will help you beat back plaque and save your smile.



1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or



Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Fluoride - Use enough -- but not too much



 The single biggest advance in oral health has been fluoride, which strengthens enamel, making it less likely to decay. Three out of four Americans drink water that is fluoridated. If your water isn't fluoridated, talk to your dental professional, who may suggest putting a fluoride application on your teeth. Many toothpastes and mouth rinses also contain fluoride. Fluoride should be used sparingly in young children -- no more than a pea-sized dab on the toothbrush. Too much can cause white spots on teeth.   



1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or



Friday, April 26, 2013

What are cavities?



Your mouth is a busy place. Bacteria - tiny colonies of living organisms are constantly on the move on your teeth, gums, lips and tongue.
Having bacteria in your mouth is a normal thing. While some of the bacteria can be harmful, most are not and some are even helpful.
Certain types of bacteria, however, can attach themselves to hard surfaces like the enamel that covers your teeth. If they're not removed, they multiply and grow in number until a colony forms. More bacteria of different types attach to the colony already growing on the tooth enamel. Proteins that are present in your saliva (spit) also mix in and the bacteria colony becomes a whitish film on the tooth. This film is called plaque, and it's what causes cavities.

1-877-Dr Teeth - (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or


Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Flossing for oral health...


Family Dental Care 
You can't reach the tight spaces between your teeth or under your gumline with a toothbrush. 
That's why daily flossing is important. When you floss:
  • Don't skimp. Break off about 18 inches (46 centimeters) of dental floss. Wind most of the floss around the middle finger on one hand, and the rest around the middle finger on the other hand — leaving about 1 inch (3 centimeters) to floss your first tooth.
  • Take it one tooth at a time. Use your thumbs and forefingers to gently pull the floss from the gumline to the top of the tooth to scrape off plaque. Rub the floss against all sides of the tooth. Unwind to fresh floss as you progress to the next tooth.
  • Keep it up. If you have trouble getting floss through your teeth, try the waxed variety. If it's hard to manipulate the floss, use a floss holder or an interdental cleaner — such as a dental pick or stick designed to clean between the teeth.

Customer Support

Town Center Dental strives to provide the best service available
We work hard to make sure your Dental experience is great from your first call to your follow up calls and care. Please feel free to contact us with your questions or concerns. We look forward to your call!