Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Coffee and donuts: beware this quick fix

Coffee and donuts: beware this quick fix

Donuts and coffee may be bad for your teeth
You're late for work and skip breakfast, so during the commute, you pick up a donut and cup of coffee and you're on your way. This common quick fix breakfast scenario can lengthen your time spent in the dental chair, reports the Academy of General Dentistry.
The sugars in donuts have been identified as a risk factor for gum inflammation and cavities. The Academy reported findings from a report that compared the sugars found in plain donuts with sugars found in oatmeal cookies. The study discovered that the sugars in oatmeal cookies amount to only one-fifth of the sugars in plain donuts.
The amount of sugar and cream in your coffee also can have a direct effect on the amount of cavity-causing bacteria. Tannins found in coffee etch into the pits and grooves of the tooth enamel, producing a rough stained surface.
What can we do to lessen the sugar bath our teeth receive from this common breakfast combination?
  • Don't nurse your coffee or pick at that donut throughout the morning. When you eat your donut quickly, it limits the exposure time to the sugar bacteria attack.
  • Rinse your mouth with water or brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste immediately after finishing your breakfast.
  • Cut back on the amount of cream and sugar in your coffee.
  • Instead of a sugary breakfast, try picking up fruit, yogurt or a cup of oatmeal for your portable morning meal.
Coffee and doughnuts: a disastrous combo for teeth? Academy of General Dentistry.

877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Flossing for oral health

You can't reach the tight spaces between your teeth and under the gumline with a toothbrush. That's why daily flossing is important. When you floss:
  • Don't skimp. Break off about 18 inches (46 centimeters) of dental floss. Wind most of the floss around the middle finger on one hand, and the rest around the middle finger on the other hand. Grip the floss tightly between your thumbs and forefingers.
  • Be gentle. Guide the floss between your teeth using a rubbing motion. Don't snap the floss into your gums. When the floss reaches your gumline, curve it against one tooth.
  • Take it one tooth at a time. Slide the floss into the space between your gum and tooth. Use the floss to gently rub the side of the tooth in an up-and-down motion. Unwind fresh floss as you progress to the rest of your teeth.
  • Keep it up. If you find it hard to handle floss, use an interdental cleaner — such as a special wooden or plastic pick, stick or brush designed to clean between the teeth.
As long as you do a thorough job, it doesn't matter if you brush or floss first. However, flossing before brushing might allow more fluoride from your toothpaste to reach between your teeth.

-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Monday, October 27, 2014

Tips for a MouthHealthy Halloween

halloween image little girl witch
Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges.

Here are 10 ways you can help your children stay mouth healthy during Halloween and year-round.

  • Eat Halloween candy and other sugary foods with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals and helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and helps rinse away food particles.
  • Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Besides how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay. 
  • Avoid sticky candies that cling to your teeth. The stickier candies, like taffy and gummy bears, take longer to get washed away by saliva, increasing the risk for tooth decay.
  • Drink more water. Drinking optimally fluoridated water can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are fluoridated. 
  • Maintain a healthy diet. Your body is like a complex machine. The foods you choose as fuel and how often you "fill up" affect your general health and that of your teeth and gums. 
  • Avoid beverages with added sugar such as soda, sports drinks or flavored waters. When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased.
  • Chew gum that has the ADA Seal. Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralize the acid produced by dental plaque bacteria. 
  • Brush your teeth twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste. Replace your toothbrush every three or four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won't do a good job of cleaning your teeth. 
  • Clean between teeth daily with floss. Decay-causing bacteria get between teeth where toothbrush bristles can't reach. Flossing helps remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.
  • Visit an ADA member dentist. Regular visits to your ADA-member dentist can help prevent problems from occurring and catch those that do occur early, when they are easy to "treat."
Source: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/halloween-tips

-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Monday, September 29, 2014

Top ways to prevent cavities during the holidays..

Winter is here which means holiday treats are everywhere. Most of the seasons’ favorite traditions revolve around enjoying cookies, candy and gingerbread men.
Eating all the extra sugar can cause harm to your teeth, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you will get cavities. Although sugary foods can damage your teeth, here are some tips to keep you smiling bright through the holidays while preventing cavities.

Simple tips for good Holiday oral care
You can avoid getting cavities and still enjoy holiday indulgences by making sure you practice great oral care.
• Avoid foods that take a long time to chew
Sticky food such as gummy candy, dried fruit and even caramel can damage your teeth. The hard to chew foods, hold an acid against the teeth longer than most other foods. Which prevents plaque build up. One of the easiest ways to prevent cavities is to reduce and limit the amount of these foods consumed.
• Rinse before brushing
You can still enjoy your favorite holiday wine and fruit juices but an easy trick we tell patients is to rinse your teeth with water before you start to brush them. This will wash away acid and any stains that have built up from the consumption of these acidic beverages and foods.
• Brush your teeth on the go
Taking time to brush your teeth in the morning when you wake up and at night before you go to bed is important. But we encourage patients to carry a travel size toothbrush with them and brush more often throughout the day, especially during the holidays. Brushing your teeth after eating big meals and holiday treats will help remove unwanted food that sticks around in the mouth. Plus, when you brush your teeth right after holiday parties you are less likely to eat more food. The natural sweetness of the toothpaste helps the body when it is craving something sweet. You are less likely to eat after you brush your teeth. So you could consume less overall at the holiday gathering.
• Chew sugar-free gum
Gum is a great product to keep in your purse or glove department, especially during the winter months when sweet treats lurk around every corner. Chewing gum helps wash out food particles and produces natural saliva to help balance acid in your mouth. An added bonus is chewing sugar-free gum will help your breath smell nice after a holiday meal so rest assured you will be ready when you are found standing under the mistletoe.
• Stress Less
The holidays can cause an increase amount of stress and anxiety. We see patients come in with incidents of grinding or clenching their teeth. This causes immense jaw pain and can lead to more severe issues like chipping and even headaches. We can recommend a custom night guard but it is important to prevent the pain by finding ways to alleviate your stress.
• Floss More
Everyone loves to hear his or her dentist say you need to floss more, but during the holidays we really recommend it. Flossing helps to prevent gingivitis and periodontal disease. Your teeth and wallet will thank you come the new year if you floss more through the season. One of the main complaints we here about flossing is that it is inconvenient. Floss Picks are easy to use and they are portable. The wonderful invention is a toothpick with floss on the other end. You can floss anytime anywhere, driving your car, shopping, watching television, these little handy guys make flossing fun, easy and clean. You can buy them at any supermarket in the pharmacy section. Plus they make great stocking stuffers. Even Santa wants you to have a healthy mouth.
We want to ensure that you enjoy your holiday season. 
-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com
Source: http://www.downtowndentalcare.net/top-ways-to-prevent-cavities-during-the-holidays/

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Flossing for oral health



You can't reach the tight spaces between your teeth and under the gumline with a toothbrush. That's why daily flossing is important. When you floss:
  • Don't skimp. Break off about 18 inches (46 centimeters) of dental floss. Wind most of the floss around the middle finger on one hand, and the rest around the middle finger on the other hand. Grip the floss tightly between your thumbs and forefingers.
  • Be gentle. Guide the floss between your teeth using a rubbing motion. Don't snap the floss into your gums. When the floss reaches your gumline, curve it against one tooth.
  • Take it one tooth at a time. Slide the floss into the space between your gum and tooth. Use the floss to gently rub the side of the tooth in an up-and-down motion. Unwind fresh floss as you progress to the rest of your teeth.
  • Keep it up. If you find it hard to handle floss, use an interdental cleaner — such as a special wooden or plastic pick, stick or brush designed to clean between the teeth.
  • 1-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
  • Town Center Dental
    3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
    phamdent@msn.com

Friday, August 15, 2014

Understanding Cracked Tooth

                                                           
As the name implies the cracked tooth has a crack, which can be because of trauma or if the tooth becomes weak due to some reason. The crack is not visible and diagnosis is very difficult to make. All we have are the symptoms. Patient complaints of sharp pain while chewing from the specific area but cannot pinpoint the tooth. If the dentist tries to diagnose the problem he cannot find anything clinically or by taking X –Ray’s. Either the tooth is absolutely normal or if it has any filling, no problem with the filling is found but patient feels sharp pain when pressure is applied on that tooth. If the patients have these kinds of symptoms with mostly normal looking tooth then it is called as Cracked Tooth Syndrome.

CRACKED TOOTH SYNDROME

What cause a tooth to crack

A tooth may crack due to various reasons:
  1. Chewing on hard objects or foods like ice,nuts or hard candy.
  2. Trauma or blow to the mouth
  3. Grinding and clenching of teeth/Bruxism
  4. Uneven chewing pressure
  5. Stress on a tooth
  6. Loss of a significant portion of the tooth structure through wear,large restorations/fillings.
  7. Exposure of tooth enamel to extreme temperatures,such as eating hot foods and then drinking ice water.
  8. Brittleness of teeth that have undergone root canal treatment.
     

Crack Vs Craze

There is another condition in which vertical crack like lines are seen. These lines are mostly seen in elderly patient and that too on the front tooth, but they do not have any symptoms of the cracked tooth syndrome. These are called CRAZE lines. Unlike crack these lines are very much visible to the naked eye. These craze lines are considered to be normal, though the patient is very much concerned about these. These craze lines are there because of the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the enamel, which is the outer most layer of the tooth and the dentin which is inner to enamel. The enamel and dentin are joined together molecule to molecule, so they don’t separate only the lines appear and they cause no harm to the tooth.
  CRACK VS CRAZE

Prevention

If you grind or clench your teeth, talk to your dentist about treatment. Grinding can increase your risk of cracked tooth syndrome.

1-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Monday, August 4, 2014

What causes a toothache?

Some common toothache causes

While tooth decay is often the primary cause of a toothache, it's important for you to have a complete oral examination to determine the cause. Other causes of a toothache can include the following:
  • Infection
  • Gum disease
  • Grinding teeth (bruxism)
  • Tooth trauma
  • An abnormal bite
  • Tooth eruption (in babies and school-age children)
TMJ/TMD (Temporomandibular Joint Disorder), sinus or ear infections, and tension in the facial muscles can cause discomfort that resembles a toothache, but often these health problems are accompanied by a headache.
Pain around the teeth and the jaws can be symptoms of heart disease such as angina. If your dentist suspects a medical illness could be the cause of your toothache, he or she may refer you to a physician.
If you have a toothache, you may have a cavity or advanced gum disease. The first sign of decay may be the pain you feel when you eat something sweet, very cold or very hot. If the pulp – the inside of the tooth that has tissue and nerves – has become irritated, this can cause pain in your tooth.

What symptoms accompany a toothache?

Because the symptoms of a toothache may resemble other medical conditions or dental problems, it can be difficult to diagnose the cause without a complete evaluation by your dentist. If you notice pus near the source of the pain, your tooth may have become abscessed, causing the surrounding bone to become infected. Or the pus could indicate gum disease, which is usually characterized by inflammation of the soft tissue, bleeding gums and abnormal loss of bone surrounding the teeth.
Contact your dentist immediately if you have any of the following symptoms:
  • Fever
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Swelling around the tooth area
  • Pain when you bite
  • A foul-tasting discharge
  • Continuous lasting pain

How do I alleviate the pain if I cannot see my dentist right away?

Anyone with a toothache should see a dentist at once for diagnosis and treatment. If left untreated, a toothache and the condition that is causing it can worsen. However, if you are unable to schedule an emergency appointment, the following self-care treatment can temporarily alleviate pain and inflammation from a toothache:
  • Rinse with warm salt water
  • Gently floss teeth to dislodge any food particles trapped between teeth.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen (Advil®) or acetaminophen (Tylenol®) to relieve pain.
  • Never put aspirin or any other painkiller against the gums near the aching tooth, as it may burn the gum tissue.
  • Apply an over-the-counter antiseptic containing benzocaine directly to the irritated tooth and gum to temporarily relieve pain. Direct application of oil of cloves (eugenol) may also help to numb the gums. The oil may be rubbed directly on the sore area, or soak a small piece of cotton and apply it to the sore tooth.
  • If there has been some trauma to the tooth, a cold compress may be applied on the outside cheek to relieve pain or swelling.

How can my dentist help?

Your dentist will conduct a complete oral examination to determine the location and cause of the toothache, looking for signs of swelling, redness and obvious tooth damage. He or she may also take x-rays to look for evidence of tooth decay between teeth, a cracked or impacted tooth or a disorder of the underlying bone.
Your dentist also may prescribe pain medication or antibiotics to speed the healing of your toothache. If by the time you see your dentist your tooth has become infected, then treatment could require removal of the tooth or a root canal procedure, which involves removing the damaged nerve tissue from the middle of a tooth.

Is there a way to prevent a toothache?

The key to preventing toothaches is establishing a regular oral hygiene routine and sticking to it. For example, failure to brush and floss regularly after meals can significantly increase your risk of developing cavities, which can cause toothaches.
Here are a few tips to help reduce your risk for developing a toothache:
  • Brush at least twice a day, preferably after meals and snacks.
  • Floss at least once a day to prevent gum disease.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for oral examinations and a professional cleaning.
Information courtesy of the Academy of General Dentistry

1-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Monday, June 9, 2014

Top Five Dental Symptoms You Should Never Ignore....

While everyone knows how important it is to make regular visits to their dentist’s office, it’s not secret that many people still end up putting them off.

Waiting an extra month or a few extra weeks to make an appointment for convenience or financial reasons is one thing, but putting off a dentist visit when dealing with one of the following symptoms is something completely different and dangerous to your health.

Here are the top five dental symptoms you should never ignore:
1. Toothache- Besides being painful, toothaches can signify a wide variety of serious problems, ranging from a cavity to an abscess, impacted tooth or gum disease. A visit to the dentist following a toothache can help save the tooth, and help to identify the underlying cause of the problem before it gets worse.

2. Bleeding or Sore Gums- Many people know about gingivitis from mouthwash TV commercials, but fewer know about these potential symptoms and their link. Luckily, gingivitis is an early and reversible stage of gum disease that is treatable, so be sure to see a dentist if you experience these symptoms.

3. Jaw pain- This could be a precursor to many different possible ailments, with many possible causes such as teeth grinding, sinus problems, or an injury to the jaw. A dentist can determine the source of the problem through an exam and/or x-rays, so be sure to make a visit if you experience pain, popping or clicking in the jaw.

4. Sensitive Teeth- Many companies make products for sensitive teeth, but such products don’t address the root of the problem, which could be related to fractured teeth, worn tooth enamel or fillings, tooth decay and more. Be sure to see a dentist if the problem persists for an extended period of time.

5. Cracked or broken tooth- These can happen for a number of reasons, and are sometimes very hard to spot, even on x-rays. They can often be precipitated by pain while chewing and can lead to bigger problems in a short amount of time. If you suspect a broken tooth, be sure to contact your dentist right away.
Source: Mouth Healthy website from the American Dental Association http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/top-ten-dental-symptoms.aspx

1-877-Dr Teeth(360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or
phamdent@msn.com

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Evolution of the Toothbrush


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Simple Sticks
All the way back to around 3500 BC, Egyptians and Babylonians chewed on sticks.  What else did they have to do all day, back before the Internet?  But it turns out that these sticks actually served a purpose.  By chewing on one end until the fibers formed a small make-shift brush, people could clean the surfaces of their teeth.
Then people discovered Miswak, an herbal chewing stick with healing and antiseptic qualities.  In fact, studies prove that Miswak is superior to the present day toothbrush, and many people prefer it even today!  Curious? Try them out! You can buy them online here: (http://www.miswakstick.com/)
Miswak Toothbrush
Animal Hairs
Around 1500, Chinese dentists stole the hairs right off of an animal’s back!  They would pluck hairs off of cold climate pigs and paste them to a bamboo stick or animal bones.
Other primitive versions of the toothbrush include bird feathers, animal bones, porcupine quills, and boar bristles on a bamboo stick.
Animal Hair Toothbrush
The Modern Toothbrush
Then William Addis came to save the day.  As an inmate in prison, Addis used bones left over from his dinner and bristles that a generous guard provided him to create a toothbrush.  Upon his release, he refined his invention to use cow tail hair drilled and tied to a cow bone.  He then began mass producing his toothbrush and selling it all over the world.
His company still exists today, although they’ve moved beyond oral hygiene. 
William Addis Toothbrushes
The World Wars
Isn’t it hard to believe that the daily routine of brushing your teeth, as we know it today, began such a short time ago?
Brushing your teeth only became popular in the US after soldiers returned home.  During the war, our government had strict requirements for soldiers regarding their oral hygiene.  Brushing your teeth was a hard habit to break, and soldiers brought it home with them. 
During the war, bones weren’t always easy to come by, so handles were made from celluloid.  Then, in 1938, a company called DuPont de Nemours introduced the first nylon bristles. DuPont de Nemours used a support-the-troops marketing campaign, and people were hooked.
American Duty 1
Electric Toothbrushes
Even though it seems like electric toothbrushes are a more recent fad, the first one was invented in Switzerland in 1939, but it wasn’t introduced to the public market until the 1960s.
Originally, electric toothbrushes were intended for the “overly-vigorous type of toothbrushers.”
Overly Vigorous
What can your toothbrush do?
Today, there are over 3000 patents for toothbrushes, and they can do just about anything you want them to do.
The Oral-B Triumph 9100 with SmartGuide wirelessly transmits a map of your mouth to an LCD display and then tells you where you still need to brush and areas that need more attention.
Tooth Tunes uses sound waves to play a song for 2 minutes.  Once the song is over, you know when to stop.
Tooth Tunes
Today, you could spend hours in the toothbrush aisle mulling over all of the choices.  Which toothbrush do you think is the best? Which one gets your kid excited to brush their teeth? Does yours do any cool tricks? 

1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or

Sunday, April 13, 2014

5 Habits That Destroy Your Smile




Academy of General Dentistry spokesperson Steven A. Ghareeb, DDS, FAGD, offers advice on how to keep your smile healthy and pretty by avoiding these five bad oral health habits.

1. Not flossing
Brushing your teeth twice a day is important, but many patients don't realize that flossing at least once a day is just as critical to achieving—and maintaining—a healthy smile. Flossing removes the cavity-causing bacteria left behind from food particles that get stuck between teeth. "Although bleeding and irritation sometimes can occur when you first start flossing, it's important to keep at it," says Dr. Ghareeb. "Your gums will toughen up and your oral health will be better for it."
 

2. Brushing too soon after eating
Consuming acidic foods and beverages, such as sports and energy drinks, citrus fruits, wine, and tomatoes, can erode tooth enamel—the glossy outer layer of the tooth. Brushing your teeth too soon after eating and drinking these items can cause more damage because you are essentially brushing the acid into the teeth, not getting rid of it. Instead, you should rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic foods and beverages and wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your pearly whites!
 

3. Not replacing your toothbrush often enough
Not only are old toothbrushes ineffective, but they also harbor harmful bacteria that can cause infections. Toothbrushes should be changed every three to four months. "It's also important to change your toothbrush after you've had a cold," says Dr. Ghareeb.
 

4. Excessively bleaching your teeth
Overzealous bleaching can cause your teeth to look unnaturally white and increase tooth sensitivity. Before using an at-home bleaching product, talk to your dentist. "He or she can advise you on proper use of these products as well as which type of bleaching system will provide you with the best results," says Dr. Ghareeb.
 

5. Using a hard-bristled toothbrush
A hard-bristled toothbrush coupled with an aggressive brushing technique can cause irreversible damage to your gums. Use a soft toothbrush and gently brush your teeth at a 45-degree angle, in a circular motion. Using a back-and-forth, sawing motion causes the gums to recede, and can expose the root of the tooth, making teeth extremely sensitive.

Source: http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=5&iid=184&aid=11069

Sunday, March 16, 2014

10 Tips for Healthy, White Teeth


Not only do your teeth help you talk and chew, they can make or break your appearance. Here are 10 secrets for keeping your pearly whites in tip-top shape

  • 1 / 10

1. Go on a white-teeth diet.

If you're quaffing red wine and black tea, or smoking cigarettes or cigars, expect the results to show up as not-so-pearly whites. Other culprits to blame for dingy teeth include colas, gravies, and dark juices. Bottom line: If it's dark before you put it in your mouth, it will probably stain your teeth. Brush immediately after eating or drinking foods that stain teeth and use a good bleaching agent, either over-the-counter or in the dentist's office. For convenient teeth-cleaning action, eat an apple.

  • 2 / 10

2. Chuck your toothbrush...

...or change the head of your electric toothbrush at least every two to three months. Otherwise, you're just transferring bacteria to your mouth. According to Beverly Hills dentist Harold Katz, D.D.S., the best way to brush is by placing your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against your gums and gently moving it in a circular motion, rather than a back-and-forth motion. Grip the toothbrush like a pencil so you won't scrub too hard.

  • 3 / 10

3. Clean your tongue.

Use a tongue scraper every morning to remove tongue plaque and freshen your breath. One major cause of bad breath is the buildup of bacteria on the tongue, which a daily tongue scraping will help banish. Plus, using a tongue scraper is more effective than brushing your tongue with a toothbrush, says Dr. Katz.

  • 4 / 10

4. Eat 'detergent' foods.

Foods that are firm or crisp help clean teeth as they're eaten. We already mentioned apples (otherwise known as nature's toothbrush); other choices include raw carrots, celery, and popcorn. For best results, make 'detergent' foods the final food you eat in your meal if you know you won't be able to brush your teeth right after eating.

  • 5 / 10

5. Gargle with apple cider vinegar.

Do this in the morning and then brush as usual. The vinegar helps help remove stains, whiten teeth, and kill bacteria in your mouth and gums.



  • 6 / 10

6. Brush your teeth with baking soda once a week

This will remove stains and whiten your teeth. Use it just as you would toothpaste. You can also use salt as an alternative toothpaste. Just be sure to spit it out so it doesn't count as sodium intake! Also, if your gums start to feel raw, switch to brushing with salt every other day.

  • 7 / 10

7. Stay fresh.

To check the freshness of your breath, lick your palm and smell it while it's still wet. If you smell something, it’s time for a sugar-free breath mint. Shopping for mouthwash? Make sure it is alcohol-free. Most over-the-counter mouthwashes have too much alcohol, which can dry out the tissues in your mouth, making them more susceptible to bacteria.

  • 8 / 10

8. Practice flossing with your eyes shut.

If you can floss without having to guide your work with a mirror, you can floss in your car, at your desk, while in bed, and before important meetings. In which case, buy several packages of floss and scatter them in your car, your desk, your purse, your briefcase, your nightstand.

  • 9 / 10

9. Brush your teeth when you first get out of bed and before you get back in at night.

They're the two most crucial times, says Kathleen W. Wilson, M.D., an internist at the Ochsner Health Center in New Orleans and author of When You Think You Are Falling Apart. That’s because saliva (which keeps cavity-causing plaque off teeth) dries up at night, so it’s best to have all plaque cleaned off the teeth before sleep. It’s also important to brush first thing in the morning to brush off plaque and bacteria (morning breath!) that may have built up as you slept.

  • 10 / 10

10. Conceal with color.

Ladies: Choose a medium coral or light red lipstick. These colors make your teeth look whiter, whereas lighter-colored lipsticks tend to bring out the yellow in teeth.





To read more http://www.rd.com/slideshows/10-tips-for-healthy-whiter-teeth/#slideshow=slide1 


1-877-Dr Teeth- (360) 740-6212
Town Center Dental
3 Locations - Chehalis, Wa -- Rochester, Wa -- Rainier, Or